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Susan Sontag On Photography Ap Essay8 min read

Sep 3, 2022 6 min

Susan Sontag On Photography Ap Essay8 min read

Reading Time: 6 minutes

In her essay “On Photography,” Susan Sontag discusses the role of the photograph in society. Sontag begins by noting that while photographs can be beautiful, they are also “a way of not seeing.” She observes that photographs often depict events that are “stripped of their context, of their place in time and space.” This can be problematic, as photographs can give people a false impression of the world.

Sontag argues that photographs can be used to manipulate people’s perceptions. She cites the example of a photograph of a starving child in Africa, which was used to generate sympathy for the child’s plight. However, the photograph was taken out of context, and it was not representative of the overall situation in Africa. Sontag notes that the photograph “distorts the truth” and that it is “an instrument of war.”

Sontag also discusses the power of the photograph to create “icons.” She notes that photographs can be used to immortalize people or events, and that they can be used to “fabricate a legend.” Sontag observes that photographs can be used to create a false sense of reality, and she warns against the dangers of relying on photographs to form our opinions of the world.

What does Susan Sontag say about photography?

Susan Sontag, an American writer, philosopher and political activist, has a lot to say about photography. In her essay, “On Photography,” Sontag discusses the impact that photography has on the way we see the world.

Sontag begins her essay by stating that, “All photographs are memento mori. To take a photograph is to participate in another person’s (or thing’s) mortality, vulnerability, mutability.” She goes on to say that, “In a sense, photographs are more like footprints than works of art. They are evidence of something that has happened.”

Sontag believes that photographs can never capture the full essence of what they depict. “A photograph is a secret about a secret,” she writes. “The more it tells, the less we know.” She also believes that photographs can be misleading, and that they can “create a false sense of reality.”

Sontag concludes her essay by stating that, “The camera makes everyone a tourist in other people’s reality, and eventually in one’s own.” She believes that, as a result of photography, “We look at the world as though through a scrim, a gauzy and tenuous fabric.”

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Why did Susan Sontag write on photography?

One of the most renowned and respected American writers of the 20th century, Susan Sontag, wrote extensively on the art of photography. Why did she have such a strong interest in the medium?

Sontag was born in 1933 and came of age in a time when photography was becoming increasingly popular and accessible. She was fascinated by the potential of the new medium to capture and preserve reality. In her book “On Photography” (1977), Sontag wrote that “photography is mainly about the distinction between stillness and motion.” She believed that photography has the ability to capture a moment in time that is frozen and static, unlike motion pictures which are fluid and ever-changing.

Sontag was also interested in the power that photographs have to create meanings and tell stories. She observed that when we look at a photograph, we not only see the person or thing that is captured in the image, but we also impose our own personal thoughts and feelings onto it. For example, a photograph of a loved one can evoke powerful emotions because we associate the photograph with the person in it. Sontag argued that photographs can be used to manipulate our perceptions and memories, and that they can even be used to control public opinion.

In her book “On Photography”, Sontag wrote that “the camera makes everyone a tourist in other people’s reality, and eventually in one’s own.” By having a greater understanding of the power of photography, we can be more critical and thoughtful consumers of photography.

Why does Sontag call her essay in Plato’s cave?

In her essay “In Plato’s Cave,” Susan Sontag discusses the idea of the “double truth.” She observes that in the film The Matrix, the character Morpheus offers Neo two pills: red and blue. The red pill would allow Neo to see the “true” world, while the blue pill would return him to the false world that he had been living in. Sontag suggests that most people take the blue pill, because it is more comfortable to live in a world that is not fully real.

Sontag draws on this idea to discuss the way that people view the world. She argues that most people see the world through a “filtered” version of reality, which is created by their own biases and assumptions. In other words, people see the world the way that they want to see it, not the way that it truly is. Sontag refers to this as the “double truth.”

She illustrates this idea with the example of the Vietnam War. Most people in the United States saw the war as a just conflict, while most people in Vietnam saw it as an unjust war. Sontag argues that both of these views were correct, because they were based on the respective people’s perspectives.

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Sontag concludes her essay by urging people to see the world in its true form. She argues that this is the only way to achieve true understanding and knowledge.

When did Susan Sontag write on photography?

Susan Sontag is considered one of the most important intellectuals of the 20th century. She wrote extensively on a variety of topics, including photography. Her essay “On Photography” is one of the most important works on the subject.

Sontag wrote “On Photography” in 1977. The essay is a critical examination of the role of photography in the modern world. Sontag argues that photography has a number of negative effects, including reducing everything to images, encouraging a superficial understanding of the world, and creating a “culture of celebrity.”

Sontag’s essay is still considered one of the most important works on photography. It has been reprinted numerous times and has been translated into numerous languages.

How do photographs shape our sense of the past?

Our sense of the past is shaped by photographs in a number of ways. They can help us to remember events, and to understand how people lived in the past. Photographs can also be used to create a false sense of history, or to promote a particular view of the past.

One of the ways that photographs can help us to remember events is by providing a visual record. This can be especially important when there are no other records of the event. For example, there are no written records of the first moon landing, but there are photographs.

Photographs can also help us to understand how people lived in the past. For example, a photograph might show the interior of a house from the past, or a group of people who lived at a certain time. By looking at these photographs, we can get a better idea of what life was like for people in the past.

However, photographs can also be used to create a false sense of history, or to promote a particular view of the past. For example, a photograph might be used to make it look like a certain event happened, when it really didn’t. Or, a photograph might be used to make it look like a particular group of people was more important than they really were.

In short, photographs can shape our sense of the past in a number of ways. They can help us to remember events, to understand how people lived in the past, and to see things from a different perspective. However, they can also be used to create a false sense of history, or to promote a particular view of the past.

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How do I start reading Susan Sontag?

Susan Sontag was born on January 16, 1933, in New York City. She was a writer, filmmaker, philosopher, and political activist. Sontag published her first novel, “The Benefactor,” in 1963 and achieved mainstream success with her essay “Notes on Camp” in 1964. She wrote frequently on topics such as art, photography, and politics, and was also known for her activism on behalf of human rights. Sontag died on December 28, 2004, in New York City.

If you’re interested in reading Susan Sontag, the best place to start is with her essays. She published a number of collections throughout her career, including “Against Interpretation and Other Essays” (1966), ” Styles of Radical Will ” (1969), ” On Photography ” (1977), ” AIDS and Its Metaphors ” (1989), and ” Regarding the Pain of Others ” (2003). These collections offer a good overview of Sontag’s thinking on a variety of topics, from aesthetics to political activism.

If you’re looking for a good introduction to Sontag’s essays, try “Against Interpretation and Other Essays.” This collection includes Sontag’s most famous essays, including “Notes on Camp” and “In Plato’s Cave.”

If you’re interested in Sontag’s novels, the best place to start is with her first novel, “The Benefactor.” This novel tells the story of a wealthy man who becomes obsessed with a young woman and ultimately destroys her life. It’s a dark, psychological thriller that offers a fascinating glimpse into Sontag’s mind.

If you’re interested in Sontag’s films, the best place to start is with the documentary “Regarding Susan Sontag.” This film offers a comprehensive overview of Sontag’s life and career, and includes interviews with Sontag herself as well as with her friends and colleagues.

Was Sontag a photographer?

Susan Sontag was an American writer, filmmaker, and philosopher who addressed the nature of photography in her 1971 book “On Photography”. In the book, Sontag argues that photographs are powerful tools of propaganda and that they can be used to control the way people see the world.

Sontag was not a professional photographer, but she was very interested in the medium and its potential to influence public opinion. She was particularly concerned about the way photographs can be used to distort the truth and create misleading images.

Sontag’s book is still considered a classic text on the subject of photography. It is widely read and taught in universities around the world.

Jim Miller is an experienced graphic designer and writer who has been designing professionally since 2000. He has been writing for us since its inception in 2017, and his work has helped us become one of the most popular design resources on the web. When he's not working on new design projects, Jim enjoys spending time with his wife and kids.