3D

Additive Manufacturing 3d Printing9 min read

Jul 27, 2022 7 min

Additive Manufacturing 3d Printing9 min read

Reading Time: 7 minutes

Additive Manufacturing (AM), also referred to as 3D printing, is a process of making a three-dimensional solid object of virtually any shape from a digital model. AM is achieved using an additive process, where successive layers of material are laid down in different shapes.

The first commercially available 3D printer was the RepRap, which was released in May 2005. It could print objects from ABS plastic using Fused Deposition Modelling (FDM).

3D printing has come a long way since the early days of the RepRap. Today, there are a wide range of 3D printers available, from low-cost desktop printers to large industrial printers.

3D printing technology is used in a wide range of industries, including medical, dental, aerospace, automotive, and architecture.

Additive Manufacturing Process

The three most common types of additive manufacturing processes are:

1. Fused Deposition Modelling (FDM)

2. Selective Laser Sintering (SLS)

3. Stereolithography (SLA)

Fused Deposition Modelling (FDM)

Fused Deposition Modelling (FDM) is the most common type of additive manufacturing process. It is a process of depositing material layer-by-layer to create a three-dimensional object.

FDM is a thermoplastic extrusion process. A thermoplastic is a plastic that becomes soft when heated and can be moulded into a desired shape.

In FDM, a thermoplastic filament is heated and then extruded through a nozzle. The nozzle is attached to a print head, which moves the filament across the build platform, depositing the filament in layers.

The most common thermoplastic filaments used in FDM are ABS (acrylonitrile butadiene styrene) and PLA (polylactic acid).

Selective Laser Sintering (SLS)

Selective Laser Sintering (SLS) is a process of fusing small particles of a material together using a laser.

In SLS, a laser is used to heat the particles of material to a temperature just below their melting point. The particles are then fused together to create a three-dimensional object.

The most common material used in SLS is nylon. Other materials that can be used include glass, metal, and ceramics.

Stereolithography (SLA)

Stereolithography (SLA) is a process of creating a three-dimensional object by solidifying a liquid polymer using a laser.

In SLA, a liquid polymer is exposed to a laser beam. The laser beam causes the polymer to solidify, forming a three-dimensional object.

SLA is the oldest type of additive manufacturing process, and was first developed in the early 1980s.

3D Printing Technology

3D printing technology is used in a wide range of industries, including medical, dental, aerospace, automotive, and architecture.

Medical

3D printing technology is used in the medical industry to create medical implants, prosthetic body parts, and pharmaceuticals.

Medical implants can be made from a variety of materials, including metal, plastic, and ceramic.

Prosthetic body parts can be made from a variety of materials, including plastic, metal, and ceramic.

Pharmaceuticals can be made from a variety of materials, including plastic and metal.

Dental

3D printing technology is used in the dental industry to create dental implants, crowns, and bridges.

Is additive manufacturing same as 3D printing?

additive manufacturing

3D printing

Is additive manufacturing the same as 3D printing?

The answer to this question is a bit complicated. additive manufacturing and 3D printing are very similar, but there are some key differences.

additive manufacturing is a process of creating 3D objects by adding layers of material. This can be done with a variety of materials, including plastic, metal, and ceramic. additive manufacturing is often used for industrial applications, such as creating prototypes or producing small parts.

3D printing is a type of additive manufacturing that uses a 3D printer to create objects from a digital model. 3D printers can use a variety of materials, including plastic, metal, and ceramic. 3D printing is often used for personal applications, such as creating prototypes or printing small objects.

So, in short, additive manufacturing and 3D printing are very similar, but there are some key differences. additive manufacturing is often used for industrial applications, while 3D printing is often used for personal applications.

What type of additive manufacturing is 3D printing?

3D printing is a type of additive manufacturing that creates three-dimensional objects from a digital model. Objects are created by layering thin slices of material, typically plastic, metal, or ceramic, until the entire object is formed.

There are several different types of 3D printing technologies, each with its own advantages and disadvantages. Some of the most common types include fused deposition modeling (FDM), stereolithography (SLA), and selective laser sintering (SLS).

FDM is the most common type of 3D printing technology. It works by melting a plastic filament and then depositing it onto a build platform in thin layers. FDM is relatively cheap and easy to use, and can produce fairly high-quality prints.

SLA is a more expensive technology but can produce higher-quality prints. It works by curing a liquid resin with a laser, creating a solid object.

SLS is another expensive technology that can produce very high-quality prints. It works by heating up a layer of powder, then using a laser to fuse the powder together where it is needed.

What is additive manufacturing process in 3D printing?

Additive manufacturing (AM), also known as 3D printing, is a process of making three dimensional solid objects from a digital file. The creation of a 3D printed object is achieved using additive processes, in which successive layers of material are laid down under computer control. These layers are usually formed from a digital model or blueprint of the object to be printed, which is sliced into very thin layers.

The main benefit of additive manufacturing is the ability to produce complex 3D shapes using relatively low-cost equipment. Complexity is only limited by the size of the printer’s build envelope – the maximum size of the object that can be printed in a single build.

The additive manufacturing process begins with a 3D model or blueprint of the object to be printed. This is sliced into very thin layers using a CAD program. The slices are then converted into a format that can be read by the 3D printer.

The 3D printer then prints the object one layer at a time. The print head deposits a thin layer of molten thermoplastic or metal onto a build platform, which is then lowered by the thickness of a layer and the process is repeated.

When the object is finished, the build platform is cooled and the object is removed from the printer.

What is additive manufacturing?

Additive manufacturing (AM), also known as 3D printing, is a process of making three-dimensional solid objects from a digital file. Additive manufacturing is a type of rapid prototyping technology that builds up objects one layer at a time.

Unlike traditional manufacturing methods, in which objects are created by cutting or carving material away, additive manufacturing builds objects by adding material. This process can be used to produce a wide variety of objects, including plastic parts, metal parts, and medical implants.

Additive manufacturing has a wide range of applications, including the production of prototypes, tools, and medical implants. It is also being used to create customized consumer products and replacement parts.

The history of additive manufacturing dates back to the early 1980s, when Chuck Hull developed the first 3D printing technology. Hull’s invention, called stereolithography, used a laser to harden a photosensitive resin, creating a three-dimensional object from a digital file.

In the early 1990s, additive manufacturing began to be used to produce parts for the aerospace and automotive industries. In the 2000s, the technology began to be used to create medical implants and consumer products.

Additive manufacturing is a rapidly growing technology. In 2012, the global market for additive manufacturing was worth $2.2 billion. It is estimated that the market will grow to $11.8 billion by 2021.

What is the difference between 3D and 4D Printing?

3D Printing is the process of creating a three-dimensional object from a digital model. A 3D printer prints objects by laying down successive layers of material until the entire object is created.

4D Printing is the process of creating a three-dimensional object that can change shape after it is printed. 4D Printing is achieved by adding Programmable Matter to the 3D printing process. Programmable Matter is a substance that can change its shape and properties in response to a stimulus.

What are disadvantages of 3D printing?

The technology of 3D printing has many benefits, but there are also some disadvantages to this technology. One disadvantage is the cost of 3D printers. They can be expensive, and the materials that are used to create objects with a 3D printer can also be costly. The printers also require a lot of maintenance, and if something goes wrong with the printer, it can be expensive to repair. The quality of the objects that are printed with a 3D printer can also be a disadvantage. The resolution of 3D printers is not always very good, so the objects that are printed can be distorted or have a rough surface.

What are the 7 categories of additive manufacturing?

Additive manufacturing, also known as 3D printing, is a manufacturing process that creates three-dimensional objects from a digital model. Additive manufacturing can be used to produce a wide variety of objects, including prototypes, medical implants, and finished products.

There are several different types of additive manufacturing processes, but all of them involve building an object layer by layer. This makes additive manufacturing a very versatile process, and there are several different categories of additive manufacturing.

Here are the seven categories of additive manufacturing:

1. 3D printing

3D printing is the most common type of additive manufacturing. 3D printing is a process that creates three-dimensional objects from a digital model. Objects are created by building up the object layer by layer, using a plastic, metal, or other material.

2. 3D scanning

3D scanning is the process of creating a digital model of an object using a 3D scanner. A 3D scanner can be used to create a digital model of an object that already exists, or to create a digital model of a object that is being designed.

3. 3D printing with metal

3D printing with metal is a process that uses metal powder to create three-dimensional objects. The metal powder is melted and fused together to create the object. This type of additive manufacturing is used to create metal parts for products such as cars and aircraft.

4. 3D printing with concrete

3D printing with concrete is a process that uses concrete to create three-dimensional objects. Concrete is mixed with a colorant and a binding agent to create a paste that can be printed using a 3D printer.

5. 3D printing with bioplastics

3D printing with bioplastics is a process that uses bioplastic materials to create three-dimensional objects. Bioplastic materials are made from plant-based materials, such as corn starch or sugarcane.

6. 3D printing with edible materials

3D printing with edible materials is a process that uses food to create three-dimensional objects. Edible materials can be used to create everything from candy to pizza.

7. 4D printing

4D printing is a process that uses materials that can change shape over time. This type of additive manufacturing is used to create objects that can change shape in response to heat, light, or other stimuli.

Jim Miller is an experienced graphic designer and writer who has been designing professionally since 2000. He has been writing for us since its inception in 2017, and his work has helped us become one of the most popular design resources on the web. When he's not working on new design projects, Jim enjoys spending time with his wife and kids.